Game

The Worst Parts Of Death Stranding The Sequel Doesn’t Need

For a game with heavy themes of connecting people with kindness, there sure are plenty of human enemies to confront in Death Stranding. However, the Mules that the player constantly comes across while traversing the US landscape are nothing more than a nuisance that the player eventually learns to avoid altogether. What’s worse is that Death Stranding actively encourages players not to fight them. As the cut content from Death Stranding‘s Director’s Cut has exemplified, both the stealth and the combat is clunky and very unwieldy. Additionally, the player is discouraged from using any lethal means of takedown, in fear of causing a destructive voidout. So what this leads to is the player having to take painstaking effort to ensure all the Mules live when fighting them, making them even more annoying to deal with.

Fighting humans also doesn’t fit in much with the themes of Death Stranding, which leans very much into actively encouraging kindness and cooperation. Fighting human enemies not only tests one’s patience on this front but is antithetical to this theme. The otherworldly and often terrifying BTs of Death Stranding are a much more nuanced enemy that should be focused on in Death Stranding 2, while human enemies should be removed altogether or at least reserved for high-profile bosses.

Death Stranding 2 Needs To Improve The First Game’s Transportation

Death Stranding‘s vehicles are very clunky and handle very poorly even on straight, even terrain. The vehicles need to be revamped at the least if not removed entirely. Despite often being the best choice for transporting packages, driving vehicles is a chore especially when there are far more interesting and innovative methods of travel. The slingshot, zipline, and robot sled are unique methods of transportation design and are often faster and more fun to use than vehicles. These types of movement should be more encouraged in a Death Stranding sequel. Creating differed, uneven terrain would lend well to this and would cause players to lean more heavily into Death Stranding‘s multiplayer social features as players explore and create new transportation networks.

Death Stranding 2 Would Be Improved With Less Repetition

It is no secret that Death Stranding is repetitive and that is seemingly by design. At its core, Death Stranding is a walking simulator with Norman Reedus as a deliveryman. In this respect, there is a heavy degree of repetition as players take packages from point A to point B with very little else to consider. There are side events the players can explore, but these rarely merit anything more than additional packages to deliver from point A to point B. While many players enjoy this type of gameplay, it can be a dull affair for others and there isn’t much reason it has to be such a chore.

A simple variation on missions can be a big improvement for those looking for a change of pace from Death Stranding‘s walking simulation and cargo management. Perhaps the player has to retrieve a package from BT-infested lands or has to eliminate a particularly strong BT threatening a route. Maybe another Mule had to drop their delivery and Sam has to pick it up and finish it. Anything to change up the mundane formula would be much more fun for those that need the change of pace while ultimately not affecting the overall feel of the game.

Death Stranding 2 Needs Less Product Placement

In a weird bit of worldbuilding, Kojima decided to include product placement in his Death Stranding universe. The world may be a post-apocalyptic wasteland, but at least Monster Energy drinks still exist. It’s nonsensical and doesn’t make sense even for those sold on the absurd premise that is the rest of the game. For a AAA game, the choice to include Monster Energy or have Sam mention Ride with Norman Reedus is an odd one and takes players out of the experience, especially when Kojima took the time to make an entire soundtrack of in-universe music that includes new tracks by known singers. Death Stranding‘s Director’s Cut removed Monster from the game, so it may be that Kojima saw this as well.

While Death Stranding will always have its fans that love the game for what it is, a sequel could still stand to improve on its strand-type formula. These are just a few of the worst things about the original Death Stranding that could stand to be improved. It’s still very early, with plenty of time for Death Stranding 2 to learn from the mistakes of what came before.

Content

The Worst Parts Of Death Stranding The Sequel Doesn’t Need

For a game with heavy themes of connecting people with kindness, there sure are plenty of human enemies to confront in Death Stranding. However, the Mules that the player constantly comes across while traversing the US landscape are nothing more than a nuisance that the player eventually learns to avoid altogether. What’s worse is that Death Stranding actively encourages players not to fight them. As the cut content from Death Stranding‘s Director’s Cut has exemplified, both the stealth and the combat is clunky and very unwieldy. Additionally, the player is discouraged from using any lethal means of takedown, in fear of causing a destructive voidout. So what this leads to is the player having to take painstaking effort to ensure all the Mules live when fighting them, making them even more annoying to deal with.

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Fighting humans also doesn’t fit in much with the themes of Death Stranding, which leans very much into actively encouraging kindness and cooperation. Fighting human enemies not only tests one’s patience on this front but is antithetical to this theme. The otherworldly and often terrifying BTs of Death Stranding are a much more nuanced enemy that should be focused on in Death Stranding 2, while human enemies should be removed altogether or at least reserved for high-profile bosses.
Death Stranding 2 Needs To Improve The First Game’s Transportation

Death Stranding‘s vehicles are very clunky and handle very poorly even on straight, even terrain. The vehicles need to be revamped at the least if not removed entirely. Despite often being the best choice for transporting packages, driving vehicles is a chore especially when there are far more interesting and innovative methods of travel. The slingshot, zipline, and robot sled are unique methods of transportation design and are often faster and more fun to use than vehicles. These types of movement should be more encouraged in a Death Stranding sequel. Creating differed, uneven terrain would lend well to this and would cause players to lean more heavily into Death Stranding‘s multiplayer social features as players explore and create new transportation networks.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Death Stranding 2 Would Be Improved With Less Repetition

It is no secret that Death Stranding is repetitive and that is seemingly by design. At its core, Death Stranding is a walking simulator with Norman Reedus as a deliveryman. In this respect, there is a heavy degree of repetition as players take packages from point A to point B with very little else to consider. There are side events the players can explore, but these rarely merit anything more than additional packages to deliver from point A to point B. While many players enjoy this type of gameplay, it can be a dull affair for others and there isn’t much reason it has to be such a chore.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

A simple variation on missions can be a big improvement for those looking for a change of pace from Death Stranding‘s walking simulation and cargo management. Perhaps the player has to retrieve a package from BT-infested lands or has to eliminate a particularly strong BT threatening a route. Maybe another Mule had to drop their delivery and Sam has to pick it up and finish it. Anything to change up the mundane formula would be much more fun for those that need the change of pace while ultimately not affecting the overall feel of the game.
Death Stranding 2 Needs Less Product Placement

In a weird bit of worldbuilding, Kojima decided to include product placement in his Death Stranding universe. The world may be a post-apocalyptic wasteland, but at least Monster Energy drinks still exist. It’s nonsensical and doesn’t make sense even for those sold on the absurd premise that is the rest of the game. For a AAA game, the choice to include Monster Energy or have Sam mention Ride with Norman Reedus is an odd one and takes players out of the experience, especially when Kojima took the time to make an entire soundtrack of in-universe music that includes new tracks by known singers. Death Stranding‘s Director’s Cut removed Monster from the game, so it may be that Kojima saw this as well.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

While Death Stranding will always have its fans that love the game for what it is, a sequel could still stand to improve on its strand-type formula. These are just a few of the worst things about the original Death Stranding that could stand to be improved. It’s still very early, with plenty of time for Death Stranding 2 to learn from the mistakes of what came before.

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Tài Chính Kinh Doanh

Business Finance - Synthesize economic and financial news, market price news, insurance news.... Start-up investment opportunities, business cooperation and loan guidance. #taichinhbusiness #taichinh #tintuctaichinh #tintucbaohiem Contact Info: Website: https://taichinhquangdoanh.info/ Mail: Address: 63-47 To Hien Thanh Ward, Le Dai Hanh, Hai Ba Trung, Hanoi, Vietnam

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