Entertainment

Anaïs In Love Review: French Rom-Com Is Not Afraid To Embrace The Mess

Anaïs overshares, an obvious product of a generation that found themselves caught at the rise of the internet age. At one point, while showing tourists around her apartment that she is letting them rent, she explains her romantic life to them in French even though they don’t speak a word of her native language. This is Anaïs in a nutshell and it’s hard for a viewer to not be drawn into her freewheeling charm. It helps that Demoustier plays the title character with a kinetic buoyancy, one that bounces between the overcorrecting self-confidence of someone still trying to shake off their late 20s and a childlike naïveté that’s more of a defense mechanism rather than representative of underlying insecurity.

While an extended amount of time is spent just introducing audiences to Anaïs, the film truly finds its heart when she becomes infatuated with Emilie. Demoustier and Tedeschi’s chemistry carries the back half of the movie as they convene on a writer’s symposium that is being led by Emilie. It’s never quite clear why Anaïs is attracted to Emilie, but it really doesn’t matter. Their relationship is fueled by a passion that Anaïs has been missing in her own life. Anaïs in Love‘s romantic sensibilities aren’t the only thing that guides the film, though.

Anaïs in Love also finds moments to be brilliantly funny. One particular scene sees Anaïs go to her brother Balthazaar’s apartment where he (Xavier Guelfi) has accidentally given his partner’s lemur too much Xanax and Anaïs has an appropriately hilarious reaction. All of this and more serves to slyly reveal Anaïs to the audience, but it is one conversation with Emilie about a crush the latter had on her writing teacher when she was 14 years old that really lets viewers see Anaïs. With a slight bow of the head, it’s clear Anaïs sees herself in this 14-year-old version of Emilie and she is both embarrassed and awestruck by this revelation.

These revelations don’t amount to much because Anaïs doesn’t necessarily experience much growth during the film. At one point, she tells Daniel, “I like people who know what they want,” a statement that feels bitterly ironic coming from her. It’s clear that she doesn’t know what she wants until she meets Emilie, but this is one of the things that makes her so fascinating as a character. Demoustier’s performance and the ways in which Anaïs feels lived in make up for the first half of the film’s seeming lack of direction and its ambiguous and somewhat fantastical ending.

Anaïs in Love leans into genre conventions of the romantic comedy wholeheartedly, allowing for a lighter experience that is warm as the French sun that illuminates many of the scenes. While the film is as airy as its protagonist, Anaïs in Love never finds time to ground the audience or Anaïs, nor does it live up to the promise of a few plot threads that are left dangling. It’s clear, though, that Anaïs in Love is not afraid to embrace the mess — of life, of love, of being unsure in a world where indecisiveness is driven by the sheer number of choices being presented. These are all minor concerns in a film as spirited as this, and, like its protagonist, Anaïs in Love overcomes these obstacles through sheer force of will.

Anaïs in Love is currently playing in theaters and will be available on-demand on Friday, May 6. The film is 98 minutes long and is unrated.

Our Rating:

3 out of 5 (Good)

Content

Anaïs In Love Review: French Rom-Com Is Not Afraid To Embrace The Mess

Anaïs overshares, an obvious product of a generation that found themselves caught at the rise of the internet age. At one point, while showing tourists around her apartment that she is letting them rent, she explains her romantic life to them in French even though they don’t speak a word of her native language. This is Anaïs in a nutshell and it’s hard for a viewer to not be drawn into her freewheeling charm. It helps that Demoustier plays the title character with a kinetic buoyancy, one that bounces between the overcorrecting self-confidence of someone still trying to shake off their late 20s and a childlike naïveté that’s more of a defense mechanism rather than representative of underlying insecurity.
While an extended amount of time is spent just introducing audiences to Anaïs, the film truly finds its heart when she becomes infatuated with Emilie. Demoustier and Tedeschi’s chemistry carries the back half of the movie as they convene on a writer’s symposium that is being led by Emilie. It’s never quite clear why Anaïs is attracted to Emilie, but it really doesn’t matter. Their relationship is fueled by a passion that Anaïs has been missing in her own life. Anaïs in Love‘s romantic sensibilities aren’t the only thing that guides the film, though.

Anaïs in Love also finds moments to be brilliantly funny. One particular scene sees Anaïs go to her brother Balthazaar’s apartment where he (Xavier Guelfi) has accidentally given his partner’s lemur too much Xanax and Anaïs has an appropriately hilarious reaction. All of this and more serves to slyly reveal Anaïs to the audience, but it is one conversation with Emilie about a crush the latter had on her writing teacher when she was 14 years old that really lets viewers see Anaïs. With a slight bow of the head, it’s clear Anaïs sees herself in this 14-year-old version of Emilie and she is both embarrassed and awestruck by this revelation.
These revelations don’t amount to much because Anaïs doesn’t necessarily experience much growth during the film. At one point, she tells Daniel, “I like people who know what they want,” a statement that feels bitterly ironic coming from her. It’s clear that she doesn’t know what she wants until she meets Emilie, but this is one of the things that makes her so fascinating as a character. Demoustier’s performance and the ways in which Anaïs feels lived in make up for the first half of the film’s seeming lack of direction and its ambiguous and somewhat fantastical ending.
Anaïs in Love leans into genre conventions of the romantic comedy wholeheartedly, allowing for a lighter experience that is warm as the French sun that illuminates many of the scenes. While the film is as airy as its protagonist, Anaïs in Love never finds time to ground the audience or Anaïs, nor does it live up to the promise of a few plot threads that are left dangling. It’s clear, though, that Anaïs in Love is not afraid to embrace the mess — of life, of love, of being unsure in a world where indecisiveness is driven by the sheer number of choices being presented. These are all minor concerns in a film as spirited as this, and, like its protagonist, Anaïs in Love overcomes these obstacles through sheer force of will.
Anaïs in Love is currently playing in theaters and will be available on-demand on Friday, May 6. The film is 98 minutes long and is unrated.

Our Rating:
3 out of 5 (Good)

#Anaïs #Love #Review #French #RomCom #Afraid #Embrace #Mess

Tài Chính Kinh Doanh

Business Finance - Synthesize economic and financial news, market price news, insurance news.... Start-up investment opportunities, business cooperation and loan guidance. #taichinhbusiness #taichinh #tintuctaichinh #tintucbaohiem Contact Info: Website: https://taichinhquangdoanh.info/ Mail: Address: 63-47 To Hien Thanh Ward, Le Dai Hanh, Hai Ba Trung, Hanoi, Vietnam

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button