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10 Scariest Techno-Horror Movies

snack bar It has plot hooks that many consider ridiculous. The premise of a group of teens being harassed and slaughtered by robot guards in a shopping mall is a lot of ’80s clichés, while sneaking away in a lot of horrific moments of horror.

With its outrageous killers, gratuitous nudity, and overuse of synthesizers, the film is certainly a poster child for cheap ’80s horror movies. However, it’s going in a different direction than similar films. Killer villain. This movie is perfect for viewers looking for a healthy laugh in horror.

Prometheus (2012)

Ridley Scott Prometheus took a very serious approach to his lofty philosophical questions about the origin of life. While its horrors stem primarily from its dangerous alien lifeforms, the real monsters in the story are the biomechanical weapons created by engineers and the ruthless and calculating David 8.

Although his prequel Alien The franchise lacks its titular alien, Prometheus It has many other distressing threats. The techno-horror elements of this sci-fi film come more from layman science than circuit boards. However, weapons, artificial intelligence and experimental elements play a key role in certain themes and themes.

Children’s Games (2019)

2019 new version children’s games Ditched the evil magic ritual and reimagined Chucky as a rogue AI with some serious attachment issues.It’s an interesting and creative premise, but if Chucky doesn’t make it, it could be black mirror

This version of Chucky isn’t just a talking doll, it’s essentially an Alexa with a body. While this twist on a classic horror icon hasn’t appealed to all fans, there’s no doubt that the fear and uncertainty surrounding the future of artificial intelligence is a more recognizable form of horror than supernatural magic.

Willie’s Wonderland (2021)

Willie’s Wonderland can best be described as Five nights at Freddy A movie starring Nicolas Cage. It doesn’t do anything for thought-provoking commentary or a cautionary tale for tech/dependency overload; it’s just Nic Cage ripping killer animatronics.

The film may not be particularly complex, but it does have a certain charm and more than a few disturbing horrors. If fans want to turn off their brains and just watch a gripping horror movie with exaggerated action and absurd plot, Willie’s Wonderland is what they are looking for.

Video Dream (1983)

When a scruffy TV president discovers too much sex and violence on a show called Videodrome, he thinks he’s found the latest craze. But the more he indulges in vile and gratuitous images, the more his hallucinations begin to merge with his reality.

Most of David Cronenberg’s best films feature a churning stomach.However, the director was able to mix the techno-horror and body-horror genres in his signature and visceral way Video dreams. Part horror, part commentary on the overconsumption of extremely violent media, it is oddly considered a horror film with a moral lesson.

Black Mirror: Bandersnatch (2018)

from Netflix black mirror Might be considered the epitome of the techno-horror genre, but interactive Bandasnatch It’s really weird. Nearly every episode of the Netflix series is about some kind of tech-centric horror, whether it’s artificial intelligence, virtual reality, or some kind of technological breakthrough, but this offshoot attempts to offer viewers a unique experience to try.

The central story revolves around a programmer trying to create a best-selling computer game based on a beloved fantasy novel, but the task turns out to be too onerous for the man’s psyche. Add to that the use of mind-altering drugs, fatigue-induced hallucinations, and even demonic entities that may or may not be associated with the game, and the result is a horror movie that strives for all kinds of madness.

Terminator (1984)

some people think terminator One of the best sci-fi action movies and one of the best Arnold Schwarzenegger movies. With its motorcyclist-inspired arsenal of weapons and gear, the Terminator is a formidable presence in its own right.

However, when his humanoid form decayed to reveal a cybernetic skeleton, things went straight into horror territory, especially the chase scene at the end.While the franchise will end up leaning more towards action than horror, there’s no question that the original terminator Take visual and rhythmic inspiration from popular horror films.

Explosion-proof machine (2014)

front machine It’s a different kind of techno-horror, dealing more with the evolving psychological and ethical issues in the field of artificial intelligence.like a movie Jurassic Park yes FrankensteinThe film tackles the question of whether science can or should do something.

to be a scientist moon knightof Oscar Issac managed to create Android with human intelligence. Get the programmer’s help to run the Bechdel test and see how smart you really are. What unfolds is a disturbing character study of scientists and newly created life forms.While not much violence, the disturbing atmosphere and psychological torture meant that front machine As scary as the most violent movie.

Update (2018)

upgrade What is it poison This would be the case if Marvel/Sony went the full horror movie route. While it could have been marketed as a blockbuster action movie, the film is the perfect mix of techno-horror and subtle body-horror, showing that sometimes it doesn’t feel like a superpower.

Seeking revenge after his wife’s murder, a mechanic receives an artificial intelligence implant that grants him superhuman abilities after being paralyzed in an attack. But while AI helps him achieve his goals, he also has his own insidious agenda. Technophobia and dealing with the devil themes abound in this sci-fi thriller.

Invisible Man (2020)

from the director upgrade This is a modern take on the classic HG Wells. The original featured a chemist developing a formula that would make him invisible, while the new version featured a tech developer wielding an optically enhanced suit to track his ex-girlfriend.

It is this technique that puts this situation into the realm of probability. While the technology may be decades or even a century away from this advanced level of camouflage, the idea that anyone could use it for nefarious purposes is downright chilling, especially considering the film suspenseful plot.

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10 Scariest Techno-Horror Movies

Chopping Mall has what many would consider a ridiculous plot hook. The premise of a group of teens being stalked and massacred by robotic security guards in a mall plays to plenty of 80s cliches while still sneaking in plenty of anxious horror moments.
With its ludicrous killers, gratuitous nudity, and overuse of synthesizers, this movie is by sheer definition a fine example of a cheesy ’80s horror film. However, it does go a different direction than its peers by casting a technological marvel as the slasher villain. This movie is perfect for viewers looking for a healthy serving of laughs in their horror.
Prometheus (2012)

Ridley Scott’s Prometheus takes a very serious approach to its lofty philosophical questions about the origin of life. While its horror mainly comes from its dangerous alien lifeforms, the real monsters of the story are the biomechanical weapons created by the Engineers and the cold and calculating David 8.
While the prequel to his Alien franchise is missing its titular Xenomorph, Prometheus does have a whole host of other stomach-churning threats. The techno-horror elements in this sci-fi flick come more from unholy science than circuit boards. However, the elements of weaponry, A.I., and experimentation do play key roles in some of its motifs and themes.
Child’s Play (2019)

2019’s remake of Child’s Play ditched the evil magic rituals and reimagined Chucky as a rogue A.I. with some serious attachment issues. It was an interesting and creative premise, but if it wasn’t for Chucky being slapped in the middle of it, it could’ve been an episode of Black Mirror.
Instead of being just a talking doll, this version of Chucky is essentially Alexa with a body. While this change to a classic horror icon wasn’t well-received by all fans, there’s no doubt that fear and uncertainty surrounding the future of AI is a much more relatable type of horror than supernatural magic.
Willy’s Wonderland (2021)

Willy’s Wonderland can best be described as the Five Nights at Freddy’s movie starring Nicolas Cage. It doesn’t do anything in terms of thought-provoking commentary or cautionary tales against the overabundance/dependence on technology; it’s just Nic Cage tearing apart killer animatronics.
The movie may not be particularly complex, but it does have a certain brand of charm and more than a few unsettling scares. If fans are wanting to turn their brains off for a little while and just watch a catchy horror movie with over-the-top action and a ridiculous plot, Willy’s Wonderland is what they are looking for.
Videodrome (1983)

When a sleazy TV president discovers the excess of sex and violence on a program called Videodrome, he thinks he’s found the newest craze. But the more he subjects himself to the vile and gratuitous imagery, the more his hallucinations start melting into his reality.
Most of David Cronenberg’s best films are notable for turning stomachs. However, the director was able to blend the genres of techno-horror and body-horror in his distinct visceral fashion in Videodrome. Part scary movie, part commentary on the over-consumption of ultraviolent media, it strangely comes off as a horror film with a moral lesson.
Black Mirror: Bandersnatch (2018)

Netflix’s Black Mirror could be considered the poster child of the techno-horror genre, but the interactive Bandersnatch is truly something bizarre. Nearly all the episodes of the Netflix series deal with some sort of technological-focused horror, whether that’s A.I., virtual reality, or some form of technological advance, but this branching foray gives viewers a unique flavor to experiment with.
The core narrative focuses on a programmer trying to create a best-selling computer game based on a beloved fantasy novel, but the task proves to weigh heavy on the man’s psyche. Throw in the use of mind-altering drugs, exhaustion-induced hallucinations, and even a demonic entity that may or may not be attached to the game, and the result is a horror movie that strives for every kind of weirdness.
The Terminator (1984)

Some consider The Terminator one of the greatest sci-fi action movies and one of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s best films. With his arsenal of weaponry and biker-inspired attire, the Terminator himself is already an intimidating presence.
However, when his humanoid form a stripped away to reveal a cybernetic skeleton, that’s when things steer directly into horror territory, especially the final chase sequence. Though the franchise would eventually lean more into action than horror, there’s no doubt that the original Terminator takes visual and pacing inspiration from popular horror slashers.
Ex Machina (2014)

Ex Machina is a different breed of techno-horror, dealing more with psychological and ethical issues in the growing areas of AI. Along with films like Jurassic Park and Frankenstein, the movie tackles the matter of deciding the difference between whether science can versus whether science should do something.
When a scientist, played by Moon Knight‘s Oscar Issac, is successful in creating an android with human-level intelligence, he enlists the help of a programmer to perform the Bechdel test to see just how smart she actually is. What unfolds is an unsettling character study of both the scientists and the newly created lifeform. Though there isn’t much violence, the unsettling atmosphere and implied psychological torment make Ex Machina as scary as more violent films.
Upgrade (2018)

Upgrade is what Venom could’ve been if Marvel/Sony had gone the full horror movie route. Although it might’ve been marketed as a hard-hitting action movie, the movie is a brilliant mix of techno-horror with a subtle touch of body-horror that shows sometimes having superpowers isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.
While on a revenge quest after the murder of his wife, a mechanic receives an artificial intelligence implant that gives him superhuman abilities after an attack leaves him paralyzed. But while the A.I. does help him achieve his goal, it also has an insidious agenda of its own. Themes of technophobia and deals with the devil abound in this sci-fi thriller.
The Invisible Man (2020)

From the director of Upgrade comes this modern reimagining of the H.G. Wells classic. Where the original had a chemist developing a formula that could render him invisible, the remake features a tech developer wielding an optically-enhanced suit to stalk his ex-girlfriend.
It’s the tech that puts this scenario in the realm of probability. Although technology is perhaps decades or even a century away from this level of advanced camouflage, the idea that someone would use it for evil purposes is downright chilling, especially given the film’s suspenseful plot.

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